Home
FAQ
Subscribe
Report an Incident
HARP
archive
Contact Us

Frequently Asked Questions

Table of Contents

  1. What is the CONCERN Network?
  2. How does CONCERN work?
  3. What events merit a CONCERN bulletin?
  4. What if we experience something we would like to share with others, even though no damage or injury occurred?
  5. Who may receive CONCERN bulletins?
  6. How do I sign up to receive email CONCERN bulletins?
  7. Who do I contact with any questions regarding CONCERN?

  1. What is the CONCERN Network?

    Begun in 1984 by the National Flight Nurses Association (now, the Air & Surface Transport Nurses Association) as a simple telephone tree, the CoOperative Network Call for Emergency Regional Notification was envisioned as a mechanism to alert the air medical community of situations in which crewmembers had been injured or killed in helicopter or airplane crashes. In the ensuing twenty years, CONCERN has evolved through various incarnations to serve as a means of collecting and distributing information about a variety of air medical and critical care ground transport mishaps.

    Table of Contents

  2. How does CONCERN work?

    CONCERN is a voluntary process by which air medical / critical care ground transport operations may issue a bulletin to notify their colleagues regarding a variety of mishaps and/or tragedies. When a reportable event occurs, contact is made with CONCERN, located in the Flight For Life Colorado Communications Center in Denver, by the affected operation's administration via telephone, email, or now, the CONCERN website. Specific details are collected and then formatted for a bulletin that will be sent to members of the CONCERN email list.

    Before a bulletin is finally issued, a critical step is a confirmatory telephone call that is made by the communications center to the affected operation. The communications specialist will seek to validate both the intent of the operation to issue the bulletin and the information sent. This is to insure that bulletins contain information authorized and verified by the operation's administration.

    Table of Contents

  3. What events merit a CONCERN bulletin?

    Although CONCERN bulletins are usually associated with fatal events, such as helicopter or airplane crashes, they may be used to transmit information on a wide variety of situations even though no one is injured or killed. In general, a bulletin may be merited whenever something occurs in the course of an air medical flight or critical care ground transport that results in an emergency or precautionary termination of the trip.

    Other notable incidents include:

    • Situations, in any phase of flight, which result in damage to the aircraft sufficient to render it out of service pending inspection or repair, or that cause injury to the occupants. These may include engine or control failures, bird strikes, abrupt maneuvers, or collisions that cause damage or injury.
    • Events during ground transports which result in damage severe enough to render the ambulance out of service pending inspection or repair, or that cause injury to the occupants. These may include collisions with other vehicles or objects, departures from the roadway, vehicle malfunctions, animal strikes, rollovers, or abrupt maneuvers that cause damage or injury.
    • Precautionary landings or stops may merit a bulletin when it is felt that a condition exists that could have potentially dangerous affects for other aircraft or ambulances of the same make or model.
    • Information intended as follow-up on previously reported situations, e.g., release of names, corrections, or memorial services.

    Table of Contents

  4. What if we experience something we would like to share with others, even though no damage or injury occurred?

    In many situations, no damage or injury occurs, yet the experience may provide a useful warning for others. The Hazard Awareness Reporting Page (HARP) provides a mechanism to alert the transport community of events or conditions which nearly or could have resulted in a CONCERN bulletin.

    HARP reports are intended to be anonymous, and thus do not ask for identifying features such as program name or location. In some cases, the situation may be peculiar to a specific make of aircraft or ambulance. If this detail would single out any particular operation, the report may be edited to preserve anonymity, yet still convey the intended message.

    When a HARP submission is made, the information is transmitted via the Flight For Life Colorado Communications Center to the CONCERN coordinator. If the above guidelines are met, the report will be posted to the HARP archive and a message sent to the list members who indicate a desire to receive such notification.

    Table of Contents

  5. Who may receive CONCERN bulletins?

    Email reception of bulletins is restricted to those with current or past involvement in the air medical or critical care ground transport community. In general, this includes:

    • Pilots
    • Nurses
    • Paramedics
    • EMT's
    • Respiratory therapists
    • Physicians
    • Administrators
    • Aviation and ambulance mechanics
    • Aircraft and ambulance manufacturers and operators
    • Communications specialists

    Some allied professionals are also permitted to receive bulletins, e.g., law enforcement aviators, military medical transport crewmembers, and members of various healthcare and regulatory agencies.

    For others, archived bulletins are freely viewable.

    Table of Contents

  6. How do I sign up to receive email CONCERN bulletins?

    Go to the Subscribe link on the CONCERN Network homepage. Submit the information required in the New Subscribers area. Remember to include information on your connection to the air medical or critical care ground transport community.

    Table of Contents

  7. Who do I contact with any questions regarding CONCERN?

    The CONCERN Coordinator is David Kearns. He may be contacted through the Flight For Life Colorado Communications Center at 800-595-3712, or via email at coordinator@concern-network.org.